July 21, 2024
Property

Over $14.8 million in unclaimed property returned to 48 county governments


Over $14.8 million in unclaimed property returned to 48 county governments

Pennsylvania Treasurer, Stacy Garrity, has announced that she has returned $14.8 million in unclaimed property back to 48 county governments.“Getting this money back where it belongs is fantastic news for the Pennsylvanians who call these counties home,” Treasurer Garrity said. “I’m grateful to the many county commissioners, county treasurers and other officials who worked with us to make this happen. I look forward to working with more counties and other local government agencies, including school districts and municipalities, to return even more unclaimed property in 2024.”The Treasury Department has a long-standing practice of returning any unclaimed property to local government agencies. Treasurer Garrity made it a top priority and, as a result, more than $14.8 million has been returned since January 2021.The following counties in the Susquehanna Valley have had unclaimed property returned: Adams – $7,866 Cumberland – $20,021 Dauphin – $31,801 Franklin – $15,529 Juniata – $1,192 Mifflin – $1,173 Perry – $1,040 York – $11,793Of the $14.8 million returned, the Susquehanna Valley has had $74,886 returned in unclaimed property.“Most people think about unclaimed property being available for individuals,” Treasurer Garrity said. “But unclaimed property is also available for businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies. It only takes a couple of minutes to check our website and see if any of the $4.5 billion we’re trying to return belongs to you.”The Treasury is working to return more than $4.5 billion of unclaimed property to its rightful owners.Unclaimed property can include dormant bank accounts, uncashed checks, insurance policies, contents of forgotten safe deposit boxes, and more. State law requires businesses to report most unclaimed property to Treasury after three years of dormancy.

Pennsylvania Treasurer, Stacy Garrity, has announced that she has returned $14.8 million in unclaimed property back to 48 county governments.

“Getting this money back where it belongs is fantastic news for the Pennsylvanians who call these counties home,” Treasurer Garrity said. “I’m grateful to the many county commissioners, county treasurers and other officials who worked with us to make this happen. I look forward to working with more counties and other local government agencies, including school districts and municipalities, to return even more unclaimed property in 2024.”

The Treasury Department has a long-standing practice of returning any unclaimed property to local government agencies. Treasurer Garrity made it a top priority and, as a result, more than $14.8 million has been returned since January 2021.

The following counties in the Susquehanna Valley have had unclaimed property returned:

  • Adams – $7,866
  • Cumberland – $20,021
  • Dauphin – $31,801
  • Franklin – $15,529
  • Juniata – $1,192
  • Mifflin – $1,173
  • Perry – $1,040
  • York – $11,793

Of the $14.8 million returned, the Susquehanna Valley has had $74,886 returned in unclaimed property.

“Most people think about unclaimed property being available for individuals,” Treasurer Garrity said. “But unclaimed property is also available for businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies. It only takes a couple of minutes to check our website and see if any of the $4.5 billion we’re trying to return belongs to you.”

The Treasury is working to return more than $4.5 billion of unclaimed property to its rightful owners.

Unclaimed property can include dormant bank accounts, uncashed checks, insurance policies, contents of forgotten safe deposit boxes, and more. State law requires businesses to report most unclaimed property to Treasury after three years of dormancy.



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