June 13, 2024
Mortgage

Federal Agricultural Mortgage (NYSE:AGM) Ticks All The Boxes When It Comes To Earnings Growth


It’s common for many investors, especially those who are inexperienced, to buy shares in companies with a good story even if these companies are loss-making. Unfortunately, these high risk investments often have little probability of ever paying off, and many investors pay a price to learn their lesson. Loss making companies can act like a sponge for capital – so investors should be cautious that they’re not throwing good money after bad.

So if this idea of high risk and high reward doesn’t suit, you might be more interested in profitable, growing companies, like Federal Agricultural Mortgage (NYSE:AGM). Even if this company is fairly valued by the market, investors would agree that generating consistent profits will continue to provide Federal Agricultural Mortgage with the means to add long-term value to shareholders.

View our latest analysis for Federal Agricultural Mortgage

Federal Agricultural Mortgage’s Earnings Per Share Are Growing

Generally, companies experiencing growth in earnings per share (EPS) should see similar trends in share price. That makes EPS growth an attractive quality for any company. It certainly is nice to see that Federal Agricultural Mortgage has managed to grow EPS by 23% per year over three years. If growth like this continues on into the future, then shareholders will have plenty to smile about.

It’s often helpful to take a look at earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) margins, as well as revenue growth, to get another take on the quality of the company’s growth. Our analysis has highlighted that Federal Agricultural Mortgage’s revenue from operations did not account for all of their revenue in the previous 12 months, so our analysis of its margins might not accurately reflect the underlying business. EBIT margins for Federal Agricultural Mortgage remained fairly unchanged over the last year, however the company should be pleased to report its revenue growth for the period of 16% to US$338m. That’s progress.

The chart below shows how the company’s bottom and top lines have progressed over time. For finer detail, click on the image.

earnings-and-revenue-history

earnings-and-revenue-history

The trick, as an investor, is to find companies that are going to perform well in the future, not just in the past. While crystal balls don’t exist, you can check our visualization of consensus analyst forecasts for Federal Agricultural Mortgage’s future EPS 100% free.

Are Federal Agricultural Mortgage Insiders Aligned With All Shareholders?

It’s a necessity that company leaders act in the best interest of shareholders and so insider investment always comes as a reassurance to the market. Shareholders will be pleased by the fact that insiders own Federal Agricultural Mortgage shares worth a considerable sum. To be specific, they have US$25m worth of shares. That’s a lot of money, and no small incentive to work hard. Despite being just 1.3% of the company, the value of that investment is enough to show insiders have plenty riding on the venture.

It’s good to see that insiders are invested in the company, but are remuneration levels reasonable? Our quick analysis into CEO remuneration would seem to indicate they are. For companies with market capitalisations between US$1.0b and US$3.2b, like Federal Agricultural Mortgage, the median CEO pay is around US$5.0m.

Federal Agricultural Mortgage offered total compensation worth US$3.5m to its CEO in the year to December 2022. That comes in below the average for similar sized companies and seems pretty reasonable. While the level of CEO compensation shouldn’t be the biggest factor in how the company is viewed, modest remuneration is a positive, because it suggests that the board keeps shareholder interests in mind. It can also be a sign of a culture of integrity, in a broader sense.

Should You Add Federal Agricultural Mortgage To Your Watchlist?

You can’t deny that Federal Agricultural Mortgage has grown its earnings per share at a very impressive rate. That’s attractive. If that’s not enough, consider also that the CEO pay is quite reasonable, and insiders are well-invested alongside other shareholders. Everyone has their own preferences when it comes to investing but it definitely makes Federal Agricultural Mortgage look rather interesting indeed. You should always think about risks though. Case in point, we’ve spotted 1 warning sign for Federal Agricultural Mortgage you should be aware of.

Although Federal Agricultural Mortgage certainly looks good, it may appeal to more investors if insiders were buying up shares. If you like to see companies with insider buying, then check out this handpicked selection of companies that not only boast of strong growth but have also seen recent insider buying..

Please note the insider transactions discussed in this article refer to reportable transactions in the relevant jurisdiction.

Have feedback on this article? Concerned about the content? Get in touch with us directly. Alternatively, email editorial-team (at) simplywallst.com.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.



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