June 22, 2024
Investment

Australian Foundation Investment (ASX:AFI) Has Announced A Dividend Of A$0.115


The board of Australian Foundation Investment Company Limited (ASX:AFI) has announced that it will pay a dividend of A$0.115 per share on the 26th of February. The payment will take the dividend yield to 3.3%, which is in line with the average for the industry.

Check out our latest analysis for Australian Foundation Investment

Australian Foundation Investment Doesn’t Earn Enough To Cover Its Payments

We aren’t too impressed by dividend yields unless they can be sustained over time. Prior to this announcement, the company was paying out 107% of what it was earning. Without profits and cash flows increasing, it would be difficult for the company to continue paying the dividend at this level.

If the company can’t turn things around, EPS could fall by 5.9% over the next year. Assuming the dividend continues along recent trends, we believe the payout ratio could reach 115%, which could put the dividend under pressure if earnings don’t start to improve.

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Australian Foundation Investment Has A Solid Track Record

The company has an extended history of paying stable dividends. The dividend has gone from an annual total of A$0.22 in 2014 to the most recent total annual payment of A$0.25. This works out to be a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of approximately 1.3% a year over that time. Slow and steady dividend growth might not sound that exciting, but dividends have been stable for ten years, which we think makes this a fairly attractive offer.

Dividend Growth May Be Hard To Come By

Investors could be attracted to the stock based on the quality of its payment history. Unfortunately things aren’t as good as they seem. It’s not great to see that Australian Foundation Investment’s earnings per share has fallen at approximately 5.9% per year over the past five years. If earnings continue declining, the company may have to make the difficult choice of reducing the dividend or even stopping it completely – the opposite of dividend growth.

The Dividend Could Prove To Be Unreliable

Overall, we always like to see the dividend being raised, but we don’t think Australian Foundation Investment will make a great income stock. Although they have been consistent in the past, we think the payments are a little high to be sustained. This company is not in the top tier of income providing stocks.

Companies possessing a stable dividend policy will likely enjoy greater investor interest than those suffering from a more inconsistent approach. However, there are other things to consider for investors when analysing stock performance. Taking the debate a bit further, we’ve identified 2 warning signs for Australian Foundation Investment that investors need to be conscious of moving forward. If you are a dividend investor, you might also want to look at our curated list of high yield dividend stocks.

Have feedback on this article? Concerned about the content? Get in touch with us directly. Alternatively, email editorial-team (at) simplywallst.com.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.



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